SRFB Projects Progress as WA State Passes a Capital Budget

1/29/2018  By Tricia Snyder

With the passage of a WA State Capital Budget, SRFB Projects that were approved in December can progress to the next step of entering into contracts with the state. This year, $1,186,813 was earmarked for projects in the Yakima Basin! See the RCO press release below for more information on statewide SRFB allocations. 

OLYMPIA – The Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board and the Puget Sound Partnership today announced the award of more than $53 million in grants for projects that will protect and restore salmon habitat statewide.

“Salmon are vitally important to Washington’s economy and to our way of life. They are one of our state’s most precious resources,” said Gov. Jay Inslee. “These projects will help tackle some of the fundamental problems that are destroying our salmon populations. By making these investments we are taking steps to increase the number of salmon so there will be enough fish for future generations, orcas and for the communities and jobs that rely on the fishing industry.”

With the Legislature’s recent approval of the capital budget, grants are being distributed for 163 projects to organizations in 29 of the state’s 39 counties. The grants will be used to remove barriers that prevent salmon from migrating, increase the types and amount of habitat for salmon, protect pristine areas and restore critical habitat so salmon have places to spawn, feed, rest and grow.

Grants were given to projects in the counties below. Click to see details on each project:


Asotin County............................. $150,110

Chelan County....................... $1,368,201

Clallam County....................... $6,142,176

Clark County............................... $240,570

Columbia County......................... $22,000

Cowlitz County........................ $1,567,061

Garfield County............................ $83,300

Grays Harbor County................ $483,911

Island County............................. $825,533

Jefferson County.................... $1,693,673

King County.......................... $11,671,127

Kitsap County............................. $520,558

Kittitas County............................ $862,119

Klickitat County.......................... $598,787

Lewis County.......................... $1,000,794

Mason County......................... $4,549,648

Okanogan County..................... $487,599

Pacific County............................ $357,679

Pend Oreille County.................. $342,000

Pierce County......................... $3,528,850

San Juan County...................... $745,591

Skagit County.......................... $5,392,282

Skamania County...................... $521,548

Snohomish County................ $2,986,311

Thurston County..................... $1,254,429

Wahkiakum County................... $507,612

Walla Walla County............... $1,052,637

Whatcom County.................... $2,934,300

Yakima County........................... $228,000

Multiple Counties................... $1,096,161

 

“Salmon are the lifeblood of the Pacific Northwest,” said Sheida R. Sahandy, executive director of the Puget Sound Partnership. The Partnership’s Leadership Council is the regional salmon recovery organization for most of Puget Sound’s salmon species. “They feed our families, support our culture and fuel our economy. They are also a critical link in the entire food web of the Puget Sound ecosystem. These funds support projects that will help to renew our salmon populations.”

What is the Problem?

As people moved to Washington and built cities and towns around the water, many of the places salmon live were destroyed. In 1991, the federal government declared the first salmon as threatened with extinction. By the end of that decade, salmon populations had dwindled so much that salmon and bull trout were listed as threatened or endangered in three-quarters of the state.

“These projects are keeping us from losing salmon entirely,” said David Troutt, chair of the Salmon Recovery Funding Board. “Salmon are in trouble, but we know what to do. We have federally-approved recovery plans in place and the people to make them happen. We must continue these investments if we are to return salmon to healthy and sustainable numbers.”

How Projects are Chosen

Funding for the grants comes from the Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration fund, the state capital budget and federal sources. The projects all are linked to federally-approved recovery plans.

“Projects are thoroughly reviewed by local citizens and regional and state technical experts,” said Kaleen Cottingham, director of the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office, which administers the grants. “This multi-level approach ensures we invest the money in projects that we will know will make a difference and help us recover salmon.”

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